Sources of information about careers in STEM

  • Girls in Physics Breakfasts Each year the Vicphysics Teachers' Network organises a series of Girls in Physics Breakfasts around Victoria. They are for students in Years 10 to 12.  At each breakfast, the students share a table with two or three women who either working in the STEM areas of Physics or Engineering or who are at university.  Over the breakfast the students ask questions of the women about the work they do?, how they found a job?, what studying at university is like?, etc. This is followed by a guest speaker who talks about her current research. After the talk, there are careers-oriented activities. 
  • This is Engineering This is a careers focused website from the Royal Academy of Engineering (UK).  It is an impressively designed website with information on over 16 areas of engineering, engaging personal stories of over 20 engineers and posters.  It is like this website with lots of profiles, but there is no quiz or information on STEM roles.
  • Bullseye poster (myfuture.edu.au) - The poster consists of concentric circles with each ring containing the names of numerous careers, requiring a specific level of training in physics. The rings range from completing secondary school to doing an apprenticeship, a diploma or a degree.
  • Bullseye poster with a profile (myfuture.edu.au) - The above poster, but with a short profile of Marita Cheng, mechatronic engineer in the top corner
  • Career stories - myFuture (myfuture.edu.au) - From the same website as the posters, these are stories (3 min read) about individuals on one aspect of their career.  There are stories across all fields of study.  There re several for the sciences.  You can also search by aspects such as 'making career decisions', 'gaining and keeping work', etc.
  • WISE Campaign UK - Diversity & Inclusion Changemakers Since 1984 - (wisecampaign.org.uk) - Women in Science and Engineering (WISE) has an extensive range of resources for different audiences from students to teachers to businesses and organisations.  A resource similar in intent and basic structure to this website is 'My Skills My Life', which can be accessed under the heading 'What we do'.
  • Physics careers: what can you do with a physics degree? - The University of Sydney (sydney.edu.au) - This University of Sydney webpage has a few paragraphs on each of the following questions: Why should I consider studying physics?, What physics job opportunities are there? and How much can I earn with a physics degree?
  • Careers in Physics (unimelb.edu.au) - This University of Melbourne webpage has seven profiles of university students describing their journeys from school to university. There is also information on job types in physics, companies that employ physics people and the types of industries they are involved in.
  • What can I do with a physics degree? (prospects.ac.uk) - This UK website is very comprehensive. It lists 14 jobs that directly relate to a physics degree, each of which has a large page to itself detailing what the job entails, responsibilities, salary, working hours, what to expect, qualifications, skills, work experience, employers, professional development and career prospects. Then there is a list of 10 jobs where a physics degree would be useful, again with each having its own page as above. There are also a few profiles.
  • Physicists Profiles - Careers in Physics (aps.org) - This US website features profiles of physicists in four different areas: Academia (25), Public Service (5), Private Sector (31), National Labs (9). Each person has a full page profile with personal comments under three headings: Why Physics?, Using Physics and Advice for Students.
  • Five Myths About High School Physics (aps.org) - This US website is quite useful, although there are acronyms and terms specific to the US education system. There is also a brochure you can download.
  • What is it like to be a woman in physics? - Inside The Perimeter  20 PhD students, researchers, and staff from the Perimeter Institute share their experiences in celebration of the International Day of Women and Girls in Science.  The Perimeter Institute is a major centre for theoretical physics research, attracting a diverse community of resident and visiting scientists from around the world. Driven by curiosity, they forge new ideas about space, time, matter, and the ultimate nature of our universe, seeking to unlock its most profound secrets.